What Happens At the End of an LLC’s Term?

In its operating agreement, a Limited Liability Company, or LLC, may specify a termination date or other event that will result in the dissolution of the LLC. On the termination date or occurrence of another specified event, the LLC is “dissolved” (Corporations Code section 17707.01(e)), with only limited powers to “wind up” its affairs (Corporations Code section 17707.04).

Generally, after the dissolution has occurred, a certificate of dissolution must be filed with the California Secretary…

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California Supreme Court Issues Important New Wage and Hour Decision

On July 13, 2017, the California Supreme Court issued a decision that California employment law attorneys have been anticipating for over two years. Williams v. Superior Court (Marshalls of California, LLC) (S227228 7/13/17). The Williams decision significantly impacts the nature and extent of the information employers may be forced to give employees who sue their employers on what are commonly called “PAGA” claims. But before explaining that decision, a bit of background information is…

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Ezer Williamson Law – 2016 Year in Review

In 2016, Ezer Williamson continued to achieve excellent results for its clients, opened a second office, and expanded into the area of labor and employment law.

The Firm is excited to announce the completion of our newly remodeled South Bay office and our expanded team, including the addition of Robert C. Hayden, Esq., as Senior Counsel, and Dominique Stango and Heather Domingo, the Firm’s new legal assistants.  The addition of Mr. Hayden, Ms. Stango,…

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Ninth Circuit Rules Employer’s Mandatory Arbitration Agreement Violates the National Labor Relations Act

The Ninth Circuit recently ruled that an employer’s mandatory arbitration agreement that included a class action waiver violated the National Labor Relations Act (the “Act”) and therefore was unenforceable. Morris v. Ernst & Young LLP (9th Cir. August 22, 2016) 834 F.3d 975. The Ninth Circuit’s ruling endorses the position taken by the National Labor Relations Board (the “Board”) on this issue and is consistent with the position taken by the Seventh…

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Ezer Williamson Law proudly announces Robert C. Hayden as Senior Counsel

Ezer Williamson Law proudly announces the addition of Robert C. Hayden as Senior Counsel.

Mr. Hayden brings with him over 37 years of legal experience and expertise in the areas of labor and employment law, as well as extensive experience in business and commercial litigation, including contract and intellectual property disputes.

Prior to joining Ezer Williamson, Mr. Hayden was a partner at RG Lawyers LLP where he practiced for over six years representing both employees and…

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What is a Change Order in a Construction Contract?

“No prudent individual would make a contract for the construction of a building of any magnitude without incorporating a provision somewhere making specific and definite arrangements concerning extra work.” City Street Improvement Company v. Kroh, 158 Cal. 308, 321 (1910).

Previously on our blog, we discussed how changes to construction contracts are often unavoidable, but that there are limitations to how much a construction contract can change. In this article, we will discuss the proper tool…

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What is Incorporation by Reference in a Contract?

Previously on our blog, we discussed how more complex contracts allude to other existing contracts and documents. Incorporation by reference is the method of making these alluded-to documents part of a contract, and is often used to save space when parties want to include or reference another legal document or contract into a new contract. To properly incorporate another document by reference, it has to be adequately described in a new contract, and it…

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Examples of California Unfair Competition Lawsuits

Previously on the blog, we discussed what constitutes unfair competition in California. In this article, we will share a few examples of recent unfair competition lawsuits involving California businesses.

As a refresher, California Business and Professions Code Section 17200 prohibits “unfair competition,” which includes any unlawful, unfair or fraudulent business act or practice. It also includes any unfair, deceptive, untrue or misleading advertising, as well as any other act prohibited by the Business and Professions Code. A  violation under this…

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Selling Partnership Shares

Selling partnership shares often involves various considerations.  In most partnerships, partners can choose to sell their share of the partnership to the partnership or a new potential partner as part of the resolution of a partnership dispute or simply because the individual or entity no longer desires to be part of the partnership.

Selling partnership shares will be governed by a partnership agreement, or if there is no partnership agreement, state law will govern sale of…

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How to Modify a Contract

Varying circumstances may require parties to a contract to modify their original agreement.  For example, contract modification may be necessary if parties want to extend a contract, change its duration, alter the quantity of goods to be sold or delivered, change a delivery time or place, or change a payment amount or type.

Parties typically can modify a contract at any time, as long as all the parties agree to the changes.  Minor changes in a…

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